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Healthcare in Iceland

Iceland has a great healthcare system that provides easy and equal access to good healthcare services for all citizens. Here we will go over everything you need to know about the Icelandic healthcare system

The Iceland healthcare system is mostly paid for by taxes or around 84% of it and there is only 16% of it paid by service fees. So, the cost of healthcare in Iceland is not hefty.

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So how many hospitals are in Iceland you might ask?

Not a whole lot. There are only 2 Hospitals in Reykjavík and 6 Hospitals in total in Iceland. These hospitals in Iceland are all government-funded as there are no private hospitals in Iceland. There are only a few private health clinics in Iceland where you will have to pay more than through government-run health clinics.

Specialized hospital services are provided at Landspítali University hospital that is located in Reykjavík as well as Akureyri. The hospitals in Reykjavík are the main hospitals in Iceland.

Does Iceland have free healthcare?

The Icelandic healthcare system is not always completely free of charge. However, 84% of the Iceland healthcare system is paid for by taxes, so only 16% of the cost is paid for by service fees.

Everyone, regardless of their nationality that has been a legal resident in Iceland for six months, as well as any of their children under the age of 18, automatically becomes a member of the Icelandic social insurance system. However, if you were health insured in another EEA country before moving to Iceland then you can apply for health insurance from the day you registered your legal residence in Iceland.

How safe is Iceland?

Iceland has a great life expectancy with 83,7 years for women and 80,5 years for men. Infant mortality is also one of the lowest in the world with 1,3 deaths per 1000 live births and maternal mortality at 3 deaths per 100.000 live births.

Iceland is one of the safest countries in the world due to its low levels of crime and pollution. The tap water in Iceland is also one of the most naturally cleanest in the world. If you follow the standard safety precautions on your travels here, you will most likely enjoy a safe and happy trip as well.  

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Travel health insurance Iceland

Although Iceland is not a part of the main European continental or even a member of the European Union, it is classified as part of Europe for travel insurance. So if you live in a country that is a part of the EEA then just remember to have the health insurance card with you on your travels to Iceland. If you forget to bring the card or lose it on your travels, then you can ask for a provisional replacement certificate.

If you are traveling from a country that is no a part of the EEA, we would recommend looking into purchasing some travel insurance before your trip just to be on the safe side. Incidents do not give you a heads up before they happen.

 

If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact us as we are always happy to be of any assistance.

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